Metromaniacs Auditions

directed by Kari Steinbach

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AUDITION INFORMATION

DATES AND TIMES
Auditions on Monday, January 15 & Tuesday, January 16, 2018 at the theatre. Doors open at 6:00 pm and auditions begin at 7:00, and continue until everyone is seen. No appointments; people are seen in the order they arrive. The show performs April 27 through May 20, 2018 (Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 pm; Sundays at 2:00 pm)..

AUDITIONS
Auditions will be readings from the script. No dialects needed for auditions or the production.

AUDITION FORM
CLICK HERE for the form you can fill out and bring to the audition. (Forms will also be available at the desk.)

CHARACTER DESCRIPTIONS
MEN:
Damis (20s-30s) a poet; extravagant, lofty, and in love with love, romance, and poetry; adept physical and verbal actor
Mondor (20s-30s) servant to Damis; honest, smart, sarcastic, and witty; in love with Lisette; appealing and excellent with physical comedy
Dorante (20s-30s) friend of Damis; in love with Lucille; cluelessly unliterary
Francalou (40s-60s) father of Lucille; a playwright and secret poet; perhaps a bit blustery
Baliveau (40s-60s) a judge; provincial; befuddled, grumpy uncle to Damis; hates the arts and artists (poets)

WOMEN:
Lisette (20s) maid to Lucille; wily and witty; comic French maid; she directs the traffic of the plot; plays “Lucille” in the play within the play
Lucille (20s) daughter of Francalou; a vapid airhead; in love with poetry/poets

AUDITION SIDES
Baliveau and Francalou
Dorante and Lisette
Lucille and Lisette
Damis and Mondor #1
Damis and Mondor #2
Damis and Baliveau
Damis
Francalou and Lisette
Dorante and Lucille

SHOW DESCRIPTION
In aristocratic Paris, poets are the rock stars of the day, and young people have gone métromanie (“crazy for poetry”). And Damis has developed a particularly severe case – he’s fallen in love with the work of a mysterious poetess, not knowing that his idol is actually a middle-aged gentleman writing under a pen name. Plot twists, complications, and mistaken identities – all in rhymed verse – tumble to a happy ending in this new telling of a 1738 French farce.
“…the language is golden…almost criminally enjoyable…”  –Washington Post